Patchogue - 1899-1914

Patchogue - History - 1899-July 1914  [The Progressive Era]

L.I. Vertical File Sampler

  • "Bottle Story from Patchogue." New York Times, July 1, 1899: p. 2.
  • "Bicycle Meet at Patchogue. Ladue Wins State Championships -- Walking Record Broken." New York Times, July 2, 1899: p. 4.
  • "'Spite Fence' at Patchogue." New York Times, July 16, 1899: p. 3. -- Built by Ruth Newey Smith (one of the "Four Sisters"), in one of her less charitable moments, to deliberately ruin the view of Great South Bay, from the Ocean Avenue Hotel, across her property.
  • "Diptheria in Patchogue." New York Times, December 18, 1900: p. 5.
  • "Patchogue Official Gone. W.T. van Tuyl's Disappearance Attributed to Stock Speculation -- His Children Provided For." New York Times, June 25, 1902: p. 3.
  • "National Bank for Patchogue." New York Times, March 19, 1903: p. 3.
  • "Automobiling at Patchogue." New York Times, July 12, 1903: p. 23.
  • "Long Island Man Hunt: Alleged Patchogue Embezzler Caught in Long Island City. Headed Off at the Last Moment by Means of Telephones -- Was Moving Family and Furniture." New York Times, July 18, 1903: p. 5.
  • "Cannonade at Patchogue, by Dim Moonlight, While Editor Green Nailed Up His Picture." New York Times, March 12, 1905: p. 9.
  • "Porpoises at Patchogue: Visit South Bay and Frighten the Bathers." New York Times, July 6, 1906: p. X5.
  • "Autos at Patchogue. Many Parties Call in at the Popular Long Island Resort." New York, July 7, 1907: p. X3. 
  • "Patchogue Scooter Beats Iceboats." New York Times, February 18, 1908: p. 8. -- Sailed on Orange Lake
  • "Patchogue Hotels Open. Cottagers Arriving and Already the Festivities have Begun." New York Times, June 14, 1908: p. X4.
  • "Patchogue Parrot Sets House Afire." New York Times, June 13, 1908: p. 12. -- Embarassingly, the house belonged to a fire insurance agent.
  • "Theatricals at Patchogue: "As You Like It" Presented by Summer People -- Notable Barn Dance is a Great Success." New York Times, August 9, 1908: p. X2.
  • "Parada at Patchogue: Younger Set Gives Performances with Entertaining and Spectacular Features." New York Times, August 23, 1908: p. X4.
  • "Smallpox Follows a Patchogue Fair: Came with the Makeup, Maybe, and has Thrown the Town into a Spasm of Fear. All the Cases are Mild: Twenty of them Now, but Nobody in Danger of Dying, and Doctors Deprecate a Panic." New York Times, October 18, 1908: p. 1.
  • "Patchogue Aroused: Upward of Sixty Cases of Smallpox Reported in that Village: No Deaths Reported Yet; The Disease is a Mild Form -- Physicians at First Called It Chicken Pox. Citizens' Committee Enforcing Quarantine and Guarding 22 Houses." Suffolk County News, October 23, 1908: p. 1.
  • "Patchogue, L.I.: Yachting and Fishing Divide Time of Pleasure Seekers." New York Times, July 18, 1909: p. X3.
  • "Patchogue. Summer Colony Uneasy Over Yellow Peril." New York Times, July 25, 1909: p. X5.
  • "Strikers Attempt Violence at Patchogue.  Police Officers Necessary to Protect Garment Makers in the Latest Business of that Town - One Fined $5, Another $10."  South Side Signal, July 29, 1910:  p. 8.
  • "Patchogue: Masons Holding Their Annual Fair Here -- South Bay Yacht Cruise." New York Times, August 21, 1910: p. C12.
  • "Prohibitionists Active."  South Side Signal, December 16, 1910:  p. 1.
  • "Patchogue: An Indian Name Meaning Patches of Water -- Plans of Vacationists." New York, June 18, 1911: p. X10. -- A mistranslation of convenience
  • "Patchogue. The Volunteer Firemen's Carnival, from July 12 to 22." New York Times, July 9, 1911: p. X4.
  • "Patchogue. Record Catches of Bluefish and Weakfish Made Last Week." New York, July 16, 1911: p. X3.
  • "Patchogue. Residents to Build a Gymnasium -- Some of the Summer Visitors," New York Times, July 23, 1911: p. X3.
  • "Crabbing Parties at Patchogue Return with Many Large Catches -- Social Notes Along Sound." New York Times, August 13, 1911: p. X4.
  • "Patchogue. Great Bluefishing Season Promised to Anglers at South Bay Resort." New York Times, June 2, 1912: p. X2.
  • "Dr. Charles Willis May Have Drowned: Vain Search for Eccentric Patchogue Physician Who Lived Alone in a Beach Hut: Tracks Down to the Ocean: Gave Authorities Trouble By Developing Aversion to Clothes -- Maried Girl He Abducted." New York Times, July 16, 1913: p. 16.
  • "Patchogue Pastor Denounces Dancers:  Rev. H.S. Johnson Says Tangoers Should Wear More Clothes in the Latest Fantastics."  South Side Signal, February 6, 1914:  p. 1.
  • "Patchogue's Idea."  South Side Signal, March 20, 1914:  p. 4. -- Predicts an end of "the filthy, degrading 'white slave' photoplays" in Patchogue, only because "they do not pay."  Yet, at the same time, minstrel shows were well-attended and popular in Patchogue, a degradation of non-whites that paid, hence obviating any local moral qualms.
  • "Six Men on Trial for Highway Graft: Officers of Suffolk Contracting Company and Two Engineers at Bar. Built Patchogue Road: John A. Henessy's Chief Investigator to Testify at Riverhead To-day." New York Times, April 14, 1914: p. 2.
  • "Says Tar Hid Road Work. Coating Laid at Night to Coceal Shallow Filling, It is Asserted." New York Times, April 15, 1914: p. 8.
  • "'Movies' Pacify Graft Jury: Rebellion Averted as Prosecution in Road Case Closes." New York Times, April 17, 1914: p. 5.
  • "Kapper Hurries Graft Case: Hint that Private Roads Got Some of State Highway Gravel." New York Times, April 18, 1914: p. 8.
  • "Dynamite Joker at Large. After Causing Panic He Blows Up Stove in Patchogue Hotel."New York Times, April 21, 1914: p. 9.
  • "Road Grafters Sentenced: Eight Months in Jail for Defendants in Suffolk County." New York Times, April 24, 1914: p. 9.
  • "Woman Suffragists to Meet at Patchogue." South Side Signal, May 24, 1914: p. 1. -- Begins with, "The first Woman Suffrage Assembly District convention ever held in Suffolk County wil convene in Patchogue on Friday, May 29."  
  • "Stackpole Alimony Order: Divorce Suit at Atlanta Will Follow, Wife's Lawyer Announces." New York Times, May 20, 1914: p. 13. -- Mrs. Alice P. Stackpole was living with her mother, in Patchogue.
  • "Hospital Notes." South Side Signal, May 22, 1914: p. 5. -- The most dramatic is is of Wallace Raynor, having been run over by a train, being sent in another to Southside Hospital (Bay Shore), accompanied by Dr. E.A. Foster (of Patchogue), haing his leg amputated, and doing fine.
  • "Asks Teacher to Wash 'em: Mother's Reply to Complaint About Dirty Pupils." New York Times, May 27, 1914: p. 7.
  • "Patchogue."  Suffolk County News, June 5, 1914:  p. 3. -- Brief items, e.g., a birth in the Bailey family, opening of the New Mascot Hotel, an airdale dog going mad, Woodhull Skidmore's 6 cans of purportedly still perfect peaches preserved by his 1st wife in 1879 (i.e., 35 years earlier) possibly for sale (yuck), a comparison of thievery in Patchogue and in their incompetence in NYC (attested to, in pretty comedic terms, by Mexican-American Patchoguer, A. Salinas, "a local garage man"), and more. 
  • "Vaccination Opposed"  Port Jefferson Echo, June 6, 1914:  p. 1. -- Patchogue doctor & Brookhaven Town Health Officer's attempt to fund State-mandated local school vaccinations, meets with visceral rejections from 2 board members, so he tries for funding of nursing assistance.
  • "Wrote New Haven He'd Blow Up Train: Boy Who Threatened Cunard Line Demanded $35,000 from Railroad. Mother Takes in Washing: Father was a Patchogue Indian -- Young Joseph Cress in Hackensack Jail to be Extradited." New York Times, June 13, 1914: p. 18.
  • "Child Bride Gains Freedom: Law Invoked Permits Trial Marriage for Young Girls." New York Times, July 5, 1914: p. 8.
  • "Chauffeur Sues Ex-Employer." New York Times, July 5, 1914: p. 10.
  • "Bailey and Friend Killed Under Auto: Workman Finds Bodies of Ex-State Senator and Brooks Beneath Upset Motor. Ran Over Embankment: Brother of Dead Man Thinks He Lost His Way in a Heavy Mist on Long Island." New York Times, July 9, 1914: p. 18.
  • "Ex-Senator Bailey [Edwin, Jr.] Killed by Own Auto: He and Friend Found Under Overturned Car on Medford Road Near Patchogue Early Wednesday." South Side Signal, July 10, 1914: p. 1.
  • "Sen. Bailey Killed: Democratic Leader and Theo. Brooks Crushed to Death; Former's Auto Overturned." Suffolk County News, July 10, 1914: p. 1.
  • "Traveler's Day."  South Side Signal, July 10, 1914:  p. 4.  -- A tug-of-war for event sponsorship by Babylon and Patchogue.
  • "Ex-Senator Bailey Left $92,000." New York Times, July 29, 1914: p. 9.