Patchogue - History, 1919-1929

Patchogue - History - 1919-1929
                             [Note:  The U.S. officially remained at war until 1921] 
             [WWI Reminiscences, Women's Suffrage, The Roaring Twenties, Prohibition, Rum Running,
 
             The Gatsby Era, Speakeasies, Flappers, Movie Palaces, White Sheets, Aviation, & The Great Crash]
                  See also  Patchogue - History - World War, 1914-1918 web page
                                  Historical Periods (Suffolk County, NY) web page
                                         Under  History, 1930-1939 --  Gold Star Mothers
                                      L.I. - History - World War, 1914-1918  web page
                                  NYS - History - World War, 1914-1918  web page
--  General

  • "Patchogue." Suffolk County News, May 5, 1922: p. 2. -- reports wage reduction in effect at the lace mill; Patchogue becomes county headquarters for the Loyal Order of the Moose; ex-town supervisor Dayton Hedges (now living in Cuba) is visiting Edgar Sharp; a fire in the Patchogue Advance's offices, promptly put out by the Patchogue F.D.; a life-like RCA Victor dog in Jerome Ackerly's music store, and more

--  305th Infantry Battalion

  • "Upton Division Men Cited by Pershing:  Soldiers of 305th Infantry Win Distinguished Service Cross for Heroism in Battle."  New York Times, August 2, 1919:  p. 16. -- Among those cited is Pvt. 1st Class, Louis H. Swezey, of Patchogue, who died in battle while racing from point to point to reorganize and re-form his nearly wiped out unit, restoring morale, preserving and holding the line.

--  308th Infantry Battalion ["Lost Battalion"]

  • "'Lost Battalion' Warmly  Welcomed:  10,000 Relatives and Friends Go Down to Greet 6,000 of the 77th Division."  New York Times, April 29, 1919:  p. 6. -- Refers to Lt. Herman Schoenfeld, of Patchogue, bandmaster of the 308th Infantry ("lost battalion") band, and that the band had had the burial detail, for those of the lost battalion who were killed in action.  

--  Automobiles

  • "Kaiser's Special Motor Car Here: Queer Auto Built by Krupps, Bears Royal Emblem; Said to have been Specially Fitted Up for Emperor's Use -- Looks Like Circus Outfit." Patchogue Advance, October 31, 1919: p. 1. -- in the Rider Avenue garage of Frank H. Homan
  • "Cache of Stolen Autos Uncovered: 11 Machines are Recovered by Local Authorities: Patchogue Man Arrested: Now Believed that One of the Most Formidable Gangs of Thieves in New York Will Be Rounded Up in Short Order; More Developments Expected." Suffolk County News, September 19, 1924: p. 1.

--  Bennett, Dr. John W.

  • "Doctor Races by Sea Sled and Lifeboat Seven Miles to Aid Coast Guard's Wife."  New York Times, December 2, 1926:  p. 29.  -- Dr. John W. Bennett, races over Great South Bay to save the life of Mrs. Albert Jones, and rushes her back to the Patchogue Hospital.

--  Bigamy

  •  "Soldiers Found Guilty of Bigamy: Two Camp Upton Men Sentenced to Serve Two Years Each." New York Times, January 10, 1919: p. 4. -- The offence took place in Patchogue, and involved an unnamed maiden of the village.
  • "Travel a Hard Road: Transgressors Have Sentences Inposed by Judge Furman; War Veteran a Bigamist." Suffolk County News, December 26, 1919: p. 1. -- Husband and wife both remarried, while still married, the wife being unindicted, the husband not as lucky

--  Camp Upton

  • "Award Upward of Half Million:  To Original Owners of Land Used for Camp Upton; Young & Metzner, $400,000:  Patchogue Hopes that Order to Abandon the Camp May be Revoked.  Award Generally Looked Upon as Fairly Conservative."  Suffolk County News, October 1, 1920:  p. 1.
  • "To Auction Camp Upton.  War Department Rejects All Bids for Purchase of Buildings."  New York Times, July 17, 1921:  p. 18. -- Calls for new bids, which includes one from the Patchogue firm of Barker & Fulton, of $205, 150.
  • "Camp Upton Under Military Control Again."  Port Jefferson Echo, April 28, 1923:  p. 1.  -- Patchogue's Major J.P.D. Shiebler is ordered by the War Dept. to evict Harland Corp., whose lease has expired, and to take charge of the Camp; although another fellow Patchoguer owns two of the remaining buildings

--  Cliffton Hotel

  • "Hotel Manager Missing.  Patchogue Fears Brooklyn Man has Met with Foul Play."  New York Times, July 30, 1921:  p. 4.  -- Cliffton Hotel manager has disapeared with significant hotel funds

--  Coot  (ship grounding)
 

  • "Dumps 60 Tons of Fish.  Crew of Grounded Steamer Jettisons Cargo on Great South Beach."  New York Times, March 10, 1929:  p. 19.  -- The steamer, Coot, grounded on Fire Island in the vicinity oipposite Patchogue, abandoned its cargo to make the ship lighter, to help refloat it.

--  Cronin, Dean J.J.

  • "Honor Dean J.J. Cronin:  Twenty-Five Years' Service for Rector of Patchogue Church."  New York Times, July 4, 1922:  p. 11.

--  Death by Coffee

  • "Boiling Coffee Kills Boy.  Scalded to Death When He Drinks from Pot on the Stove."  New York Times, November 26, 1923:  p. 5.

--  Divorce

  • "Wrong Man Divorced." Port Jefferson Echo, April 26, 1919: p. 1. - A good illustration that truth is sometimes funnier, as well as stranger, than fiction.

--  Drownings

  • "Three Boys Drowned in Patchogue Lake:  Another is Rescued When Their Leaky Boat Sinks -- Widow Loses Two Sons."  New York Times, June 25, 1920:  p. 3. -- Willis and Forest Kemp and Richard Kudfahl drown, though Lewis Kemp survives, brother of the two Kemp boys who died.
  • "Youth Missing at [Cliffton House] Resort.  Coast Guard at Patchogue Joins the Search -- Empty Canoe Found."  New York Times, July 22, 1926:  p. 19. 

--  Duel Identities

  • "Dead Man Had Two Names.  Patchogue Folk Speculate on Leander S. Fulton's Identity."  New York Times, May 15, 1922:  p. 13. -- Previosuly known as, William Kennedy Lux.

--  "Dutch Charlies"

  • "75 Years Ago"  (From the Archives of the Long Island Advance).  Long Island Advance, November 24, 2005:  p. 19.  -- A confusion of "Dutch Charlies"

--  Elections

  • "Patchogue Elections Close:  Opposition for Republicans for First Time in Many Years."  New York Times, March 22, 1922:  p. 31. 

-- Elks, Benevolent Protective Order of

  • "Sues Brother Elk for False Arrest:  Official of Patchogue Lodge, Jailed on Traffic Charge, Accuses Trooper.  Court Exonerated Him:  He Spent Thre Hours in Cell on New Year's Morning Before He Could Finds Bondsman."  New York Times, February 13, 1927:  p. 24.

--  Extortion

  • Delmage are Held on Extortion Charge." Suffolk County News, Apri1 17, 1925: p. 1. -- mentions Frank and Thomas Smith of Laurel St., and William Shaber of Medford Ave., Patchogue

--  Farnum, Ruth

  • "Long Island Woman Tells of Stirring War Experiences."  Suffolk County News, February 22, 1926:  p. 1. -- Ruth Farnum, speaking to the Patchogue Sorosis, tells of being in Serbia, from the outbreak of the war, witnessing its resistance, defeat, slaughter, and returning with the Allies, at times under fire.

--  Geese

  • "Hunger Halts Wild Geese:  Large Numbers Hover Over Great South Bay Seeking Food."  New York Times, March 4, 1920:  p. 10.  -- Thick ice impedes their progress.

--  Glynne, Michael

  • "Evil Odor at Show Laid to Union War:  Three of Five Prisoners Tell of Spoiling Business at Bay Shore and Patchogue.  Labor Leader Denies Tale:  Chief of Musicians and Stage Hands Accused of Hiring Others to Cause Daily Stench."  New York Times, March 23, 1929:  p. 8.  -- Mike Glynne, proprietor of movie palaces in both towns including Ward and Glynne's (later the Patchogue Theatre), who had a running dispute with the local union, was being sabotaged by sour milk poured out before performances.

--  Gould, Charles A.

  • "Oldest Odd Fellow Dies.  Charles A. Gould, 94, Entered Lodge at Brookhaven in 1846."  New York Times, February 2, 1929:  p. 12.

--  Great South Bay

  • "Asks Curb on Boat Speeders."  New York Times, July 19, 1929:  p. 20.  

--  Horses, Rodeo

  • "Trick Bronco Shot.  Boinnie Grey's Rodeo Mount Put to Death After Injury."  New York Times, November 6, 1923:  p. 11.  -- Bronco "Duke," after being kicked by bronco, "Kiddie," was ordered put down

--  Jailbreak

  • "Rip Jail's Roof, Free Boy Burglar:  Confederates Ply 'Jimmies,' Tinsmith's Shears and Saw Unmolested at Patchogue.  Constable Gets Surprise:  Prisoner Arrested While Asleep in House Closed by Funeral Only a Day Earlier."  New York Times, October 6, 1924:  p. 22.

--  Jaycox, Hon. Walter H.

  • "To Bury Justice [Walter H.] Jaycox Today."  New York Times, February 6, 1927:  p. 26.

--  Ku Klux Klan

  • "Klan Burial at Patchogue:  Unusual Rites Performed at Grave of a Veteran Oysterman."  New York Times, May 1, 1924:  p. 10.  --Service at Congregational Church, graveside Congregational, then Klan rites, at Lakeview Cemetery 

--  Love Triangle

  • "Suit Reveals Elopement.  Mrs. John S. Clark Obtained Divorce, Naming an Actress."  New York Times, February 7, 1920:  p. 7.  -- the actress was the other woman in a love triangle

--  Millerite

  • "Reidt Wrong Again on Doom Forecast:  Apostle Fails ro Make Good on Radio Prediction of City's Destruction.  Fire Ball Doesn't Show Up:  False Prophet, Said to be Stuck in Long Island Snowdrift, Making Another Guess."  New York Times, February 14, 1926:  p. 26. 

--  Murder
 

  • "Banker Shot Dead as He Calls for Aid: Smith W. Conklin, Financier, of Patchogue, is Killed by a Detective. Slayer Wounds Himself: Policeman, Answering to Conklins Call for Help, Arrives too Late -- Quarreled Over Mortgage." New York Times, January 30, 1919: p. 2.
  • "Conklin Murder Trial."  Port Jefferson Echo, May 24, 1919:  p. 1.
  • "Killed His Father:  Eight-Year-Old Patchogue Lad Fooling with an Old Gun; Didn't Know It was Loaded:  Alfred Carlson, a Painter Living on Waverly Ave., had One Side of His Head Torn Away -- Lived an Hour and a Half."  Suffolk County News, November 28, 1919:  p. 1. 

--  Naval aviation

  • "Navy Seaplanes Wait on Weather:  Start  on First Transatlantic Leg, Set for Today, is Problematical; NC-4 Engineer Loses Hand:  Propeller Takes It Off at Wrist -- Two of Transocean Machines Make Successful Flights."  New York Times, May 8, 1919:  p. 12. -- Chief Machinist E.H. Howard, of Patchogue, was the unfortunate accident victim.
  • "Airmen Save 3 from Bay. Recue Girl and Two Men, in Flying Boat at Patchogue." New York Times, August 4, 1919: p. 3.  -- A duck drop from a flying boat was halted by the ASPCA, until an imitation duck could be substituted.  As the flying boat took off, 3 children struggling in the water next to a capsized boat were sighted, which turned the race into a rescue, and the race was ultimately canceled.  But the children were saved.

--  Patchogue Congregational Church

  • "C.E. President Pleads for Peace:  Say Christianity Must Outlaw Future Wars; Nathaniel Talmadge Points Out Probable Horrors of Another Conflict -- Forty-Seventh Birthday of Organization Celebrated Tuesday Night."  Patchogue Advance, February 3, 1928:  p. 1.  -- Suffolk County Christian Endeavor Society and its Patchogue chapter meeting at Patchogue Congregational Church

--  Patchogue-Plymouth Mills  [Lace Mill]

  • "Big Plants in Merger: Capitalize Patchogue-Plymouth Mills Company at $1,500,00." New York Times, September 9, 1919: p. 30.  
  • "Rob 2 Messengers of $8,000; Shoot One:  Four Men Get Payroll of Patchogue Sales Concern -- Make Change of Autos in Escape.  Some Think It Movie Act:  But Policemen and Motorcyclist Give Chase After Seeing Shooting -- Head This Way."  New York Times, November 20, 1920:  p. 19.  -- The payroll couriers were from Patchogue-Plymouth Sales Corp. (the Lace Mill).
  • "Patchogue Mills Dividend."  New York Times, November 20, 1921:  p. 24. -- After their 1st year of merged existence.

--  Potter, R.A.

  • "R..A. Potter Dies in City:  Patchogue Jeweler Suddenly Chokes in New York Restaurant."  Suffolk County News, September 18, 1925:  p. 1.

--  Prohibition

  • Prohibition Era Patchogue-Area -- An Index (to selected Patchogue Advance articles) [searchable], comp. by Lenora M. Henson.  Geneseo, NY:  SUNY at Geneseo; The Compiler, 1994 (Patchogue Medford Library.  Celia M. Hastings Local History Room.  Digital Archives) -- Classified under the following headings:  Advertisements, Boats / Crews Seized, Camp Upton, Cartoons, Corruption, Deaths from Alcohol, Editorials, "Getting Out of This Mess," Ku Klux Klan Involvement, Local Issues / Politics, Miscellaneous, Soldiers (Non-Specific), State Issues / Politics, Violators (the longest section, by far).  Entries sometimes include a name, followed by the date of the article (day month year, followed by a slash, then either a page number or section : page no.:  e.g.:  Sparkle [ship name], 24Apr24/16; 13Aug20/1:2.  Entries are searchable, using Control + F[ind] and entering a name, search term, or one of the classified headings above.  -- MR 
  • "Alleged Whiskey Dealers Caught:  Village Police and U.S. Agents Make Arrests; Evidence Secured by [Boldier?] Detectives Employed by the Village -- Defendants Held in [sic] Heavy Bail in Federal Court."  Patchogue Advance, August 27, 1920:  pp. 1, 4.
  • "Army Bootlegging Laid to Officers:  Enlisted Men at Camp Upton Said to Obtain Whisk[e]y from Their Commanders; Three Men are Arrested:  Evidence Obtained by Government Investigators Employed by Village of Patchogue."  New York Times, September 2, 1920:  p. 12.  
  • "Posses to Check Crime.  Long Island Towns Organize for Quick Aid in Two Counties."  New York Times, January 8, 1921:  p. 2.  -- Officially approved prohibitionist vigilantes, Nassau & Suffolk County
  • "50 Years Ago - January 13, 1922" (Notes from the Old Files).  Long Island Advance, January 13, 1972:  [n.p.] -- reports 30 gallons of liquor poured into the Patchogue River at the Mulford St. dock, with the perported result of staggering oysters.
  • "Spotlight at Last on L.I. Rum Scandal: Hi-Jacking Patchoguer and Trooper Shot at Montauk: Big Liquor Cache Found; Despite Official Efforts to Hush Up Affair, Smith Bros. and Wm. Shaber of Patchogue and Trooper. 
  • "Warfare on Local Speakeasies -- Warning Ticket is Latest Idea; Two South Street Places Raided:  'Speakeasy Tickets' for Thirsty Ones; Police Find Liquor at Carcio's and Briscoe's."  Patchogue Advance, April 12, 1929:  pp. 1-2, 4.
  • O'Neill, Kevin.  "Tales of Bootleggers and Speakeasies."  Long Island Advance, December 9, 1993:  pp. 13-14.    

--- PML Catalog Sampler:

--  Property Taxation

  • "Patchogue Cuts Budget.  Record High Tax Rate of $2 Per $1,000 of Property Announced."  New York Times, April 29, 1929:  p. 2.

--  Prostitution?

  • "County Officers and Local Police Raid 'Social Club' at Mrs. Pope's and Frank's Tavern as Nuissances."  Patchogue Advance, January 22, 1929:  p. 1.

--  Real Estate

  • "Lots Sold for Taxes:  Thousands Sold on Long Island to Highest Bidder."  New York Times, November 30, 1919:  p. S5.  -- The defunct Great South Bay Yacht Club's building and land at Patchogue were sold. 

--  Realto Theatre

  • "Asks for Receiver for Rialto Theatre." Port Jefferson Echo, September 11, 1924: p. 1.

--  Roads, Concrete

  • "Patchogue Road Work."  New York Times, June 13, 1920:  p. 82.  -- Remarks that the concrete roadbed layed on Main St. in 1917, had held up remarkably well considering the unexpectedly high volume of military and civilian traffic, given the proximity of Camp Upton, during the war.  Oak St. and a section of N. Ocean were paved with concrete in 1919.

--  Roe, Nettie

  • "Miss Nettie Roe" [obit.].  Patchogue Advance, March 27, 1928:  p. 4. -- of 282 East Main St., burial in Cedar Grove Cem.
  • "Spend $10,000 Trying to Locate Roe Nephew:  Executors of Estate of Nettie Roe Unable to Find Trace of 'John J. Roe' -- Estate Goes for Hospital if Relative is Not Located."  Patchogue Advance, November 13, 1928:  p. 1.

--  Ruland, Ethel M.

  • "Girl Found Shot. Discovered by Father in Garage with Pistol Beside Her." New York Times, December 31, 1919: p. 24. -- Ethel M. Ruland, of 299 South Ocean Ave.

--  Smith, Ruth Newey

  • "Smith is Competent:  Sheriff's Jury So Decided at Islip Town Hall Monday; A Former Jury Discharged."  Suffolk County News, September 19, 1919:  p. 1. -- Heir to Ruth Newey Smith's fortune.

--  Sumner, Rear Adm. George Watson

  • "Civil War Veteran of Navy Dies at 82:  Rear Admiral George Watson Sumner Fought Under Admiral Farragut.  Navy Yard Captain Here:  One of His Sons is John S. Sumner,  Head of Society for Suppression of Vice."  New York Times, February 21, 1924:  p. 17.

--  Sumner, M. W.

  • "Mrs. M.W. Sumner:  Widow of Rear Admiral George H. Sumner  Dies at 86."  New York Times, March 25, 1929:  p. 14.

--  Tobacco

  • "Tobacco Smoke Mystery Cleared by Revenue Man."  New York Times, March 20, 1924:  p. 21.

--  Tuberculosis

  • "Tell of County T.B. Work:  At Annual Meeting of Suffolk  Committee Held in Patchogue."  Suffolk County News, June 9, 1922:  p. 1.

--  U.S. Post Office 

  • "Plane Wins Against Boat.  Patchogue Flier First in Mail Races to Fire Island."  New York Times, July 5, 1929:  p. 31.

--  Van Pelt, John J.

  • "John J. Van Pelt Dies.  Head of Four Department Stores on Long Island was 51.  New York Times, February 5, 1929:  p. 22.  -- Not the architect, but his son, who was president of Swezey & Newins.

--  Veterans
 

--  Walker, Jimmy, Mayor, New York City

  • "[Jimmy] Walker as Beauty Judge:  Delegation from Patchogue to Urge [NYC] Mayor to Act at Celebration."  New York Times, June 28, 1926:  p. 7.

--  Weddings

  • "G.C. Van Tuyl Wed to Mrs. Gladwell:  Ex-President of Metropolitan Trust Co. Marries the Sister of Francis Starr:  In Heavenly Rest Church." New York Times, August 22, 1920:  p. 20.

--  Wright, Frances M.
 

  • "Woman, 100, Celebrates:  Patchogue Resident has All Her Faculties and Good Health."  New York Times, June 2, 1921:  p. 23.  -- Frances M. Wright