Patchogue - History - World War, 1914-1918

Patchogue - History - World War, 1914-1918
 
(Note:  Official U.S. participation was from 1917-1921)
 
                      See also  L.I. - History - World War, 1914-1918  web page
                                     NYS - History - World War, 1914-1918  web page
                                     Patchogue - History - 1919-1929 web page
                                              Historical Periods (Suffolk County, NY) web page 
                                            Under  History, 1930-1939 --> Gold Star Mothers
 
-- General

--- PML Catalog Sampler:

--- LI Vertical File Sampler:

  • "City of Patchogue in 1950:  Marvelous Changes Wrought in the City's Growth Through Extensive Cultivation of Surrounding Land and Inland Waterway; Brief Imaginary Review of the City's Growth from 1914 to 1950 -- Railroad Route through Village Changed -- Population Increases Rapidly Raching 35,000 in 1950 -- Progressive Spirit of Citizens Shown."  Patchogue Advance, Patchogue Progress Edition, August 14, 1914:  pp. 1-2. -- In a sort of "World of Tomorrow" vein, with about as much accuracy as those projected at the World's Fairs of 1939 and 1964-65.
  • "Patchogue."  Suffolk County News, January 1, 1915:  2.  -- Elks' charitable work; Elmer S. Millard works for Vitograph Co.; Earl M. Turner goes to player piano school; A. Salinas, Jr.'s father, anti-Villista is captured, his fate is unknown; E. Bailey & Sons is thriving, as is the lace mill; Elks are to meet at the Central Hotel on 1/6, to form a local club; movie star, Stewart Tabor, of Sag Harbor, whose parents moved to Patchogue, now stars again, in the flick, "Lena Rivers"; James Nulty, fireman, requires an operation to reconnect his thumb, following a fire-related accident; Walter S. Price, son of Capt. Alfred & nephew of John N. Price, having left Patchogue 43 years earlier, briefly lived in Pennsylvian, then diasappeared for 20 years, has resurfaced in California...; and more.  
  • "Patchogue's Budget."  South Side Signal, March 15, 1915:  p. 3.  
  • "Patchogue."  Suffolk County News, April 23, 1915:  p. 1. -- 200 attend testimonial ball for Elizabeth Mott Smith; Capt. Bill Graham discovered that a large stone in the Patchogue Argus' office is actually the gravestone of Healthcote M. Hiatt, who was buried in Setauket; village trustee, John E. Ketcham disqualifies himself from office; 3 men in a car come visiting Mrs. Grace Terrell's house, at high speed in an automobile.  "The corner of the house was completely carried away and the machine and its occupants were found [unharmed] a few moments later by Miss Josephine Terrell, partly in the parlor and partly out the other side."
  • "Bowling News:  Patchogue Again Defeated on Their Home Alleys."  Suffolk County News, April 28, 1916:  p. 1.
  • "Health Officer Overton Ousted." Port Jefferson Echo, August 5, 1916: p. 1.
  • "Patchogue's Aged Twins."  South Side Signal, September 22, 1916:  p. 1. -- Ira B. Moore (Civil War Veteran) and Isaac T. Moore
  • "Patchogue."  Suffolk County News, August 17, 1917:  p. 2.  -- Includes news that (a) Patchogue is about to enforce its cerfew; (b) Jesse Butcher, New York Times reporter, from Patchogue, is vacationing to gain enough weight, to allow him to enlist (doctors having turned him down 4 times); (c) Freemont Hammond is working with "Sperry, the Inventor" on radio signals for submarine chasers (sonar?), in Brooklyn; Albert H. Conklin (of Patchogue) and Leland P. Smith are the first people from the area, to reach France.
  • "Patchogue."  Suffolk County News, August 31, 1917:  p. 2.  --  Mentions that: (a) 2 stores in Unique Theatre, leased by Mrs. Wilmot (Elizabeth) M. Smith were being fitted out as "The Upton Cozy," consisting of a rest room, lunch room, and information bureau for Camp Upton soldiers visiting Patchogue; (b) Sylvester ("Tug") Swezey was awaiting word from a grand jury on charges of "white slavery" brought against him, by the NYS Fosdick Commission; (c) PELCO foreman Louis Maresco's near electrocution; (d) a Patchogue Federation has recently been formed to aid soldiers from Camp Upton, visiting Patchogue, and lists its officers.
  • "War Work Campaign:  First Gun Fired at Patchogue Last Saturday Night; At Dinner at Old Oak Inn:  Congressman Frederick C. Hicks Back from the Firing Line Made a Wonderfully Eloquent Address -- Speeches by Herbet L. Pratt and Others."  Suffolk County News, November 1, 1918:  p. 1.
  • "Back from the Firing Line:, Herbert L. Pratt and Congressman Hicks Discuss the Soldier at the Front and His Needs; Planning United War Work Campaign; Meeting at Patchogue -- Largely Attended by Representative Long Islanders.South Side Signal,November 1, 1918: p. 1."

-- Aerial operations
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Aviator Flies Over Patchogue." Port Jefferson Echo, August 28, 1915: p. 1. -- Lawrence Sperry overflew Patchogue twice, during flight between Amityville and Bellport, in his "hydro-aeroplane", achieving the then dizzying speed of 25 miles in 20 mins.
  • "Patchogue Flier Honored: K.R. Smith, Former Yale Student, Decorated for Sinking U-Boat." New York Times, July 2, 1918: p. 4. 

-- Accidents, automotive
             See also  Lawsuits
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Bailey and Friend Killed Under Auto:  Workman Finds Bodies of Ex-State Senator and Brooks Beneath Upset Motor.  Ran Over Embankment:  Brother of Dead Man Thinks He Lost His Way in a Heavy Mist on Long Island."  New York Times, July 19, 1914:  p. 18. --  Edwin Bailey, Jr. and Theodore Brooks found alongside Medfrod Road (Rte. 112), about 4 mi. north of Patchogue, just past a railroad bridge.  The weight of the loss may well have been a contributing factor, in J. Robert Bailey's later suicide.
  • "Killed Dodging a Cow. Waterson, Noted as Racing Autoist, Thrown from Motor Cycle." New York Times, August 8, 1914: p. 14.  --  This East Patchogue, Robinson Blvd., accident occurred during a test drive, when he had to suddenly veer to avoid a bad steer.  He was taken by 2 R.C. priests, who happened to be passers-by, to the Old Oak Hotel, where he was summering, was then treated by 3 doctors and expired within 3 hours, whereafter the priests probably again came in handy.
  • "Auto Crashes in Side of House:  Unusual Accident at Patchogue Early Sunday Morning in which Former Babylonian is Prominent.  Steering went Wrong:  Edwin B. Weeks, Who was Driving, Cannot Account for the Action of His Car -- With Two Others had Visited Sick Friend at Port Jefferson."  South Side Signal, April 23, 1915:  p. 1. 
  • "Falling Live Wire Burns 5 Autoists:  Current Surges Through Metal Work of Car, Enveloping Occupants in Sparks.  Motor Kills a Bicyclist; Boy Leaving Sunday School Runs in Auto's Path and is Mortally Hurt."  New York Times, August 23, 1915:  p. 5.
  • "Lawyer Struck by Auto:  Hawkins Returning from Jeni's Hearing, Injured in Bayport."  New York Times,  September 29, 1916:  p. 7.  --  Ralph J. Hawkins, a Patchogue layer, was hit by a doctor
  • "Man Instantly Killed:  Richard Hawkins, of Patchogue, Fell From Motorcycle Sunday."  Suffolk County News,July 12, 1918:  p. 1.                                                                                                                       
  • "Principal of Patchogue School Killed." Port Jefferson Echo, September 7, 1918: p. 1.

--  African-Americans
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Negro Woman Murdered:  Colored Soldier Confesses but Claims Self Defense."  Suffolk County News, March 1, 1918:  p. 1.

--  Alsatians
            See  Divided family loyalties  (below)
 
--  Anti-Germanism 
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Patchogue Schools Bar German."  New York Times, May 17, 1918:  p. 9.  -- And German-language Emanuel Lutheran Church services are eliminated.
  • "Paste the Kaiser with W.S.S. on June 28th" [advertisement].  Patchogue Advance, June 21, 1918:  n.p.  -- W.S.S. were War Savings Stamps, and June 28th was designated National War Savings Day.

 
-- Armistice, 1918
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Big Celebration of Victory News:  One Big Parade Right After Another; Kaiser has a Bad Day in Patchogue -- Mills and Schools Close -- Regular Holiday."  Patchogue Advance, November 15, 1918:  p. 1.  

-- Associations

--- LI Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Local Jr. O.U.A.M. has Fine Opening:  Suffolk Council, No. 177, Formally Instituted Last Saturday woth Great Ceremony -- Over Eighty Visitors."  South Side Signal, March 19 1915:  p. 1.
  • "Boys' Conference Plans: A Fine Program has Been Arranged for Patchogue Gathering."Long Islander, October 22, 1915: p. 4.
  • "Whitman to Open Fair: Will Address Elks' Carnival at Patchgue on Aug. 12." New York Times, August 6, 1916: p. 15. -- i.e., NYS Governor Charles Seymourt Whitman

--  Austro-Hungarian Embassy (summer residence)
 
--- LI Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Patchogue Gets Embassy: Baron Zweldinek, Austrian Charge, Rents Cottage for the Summer." New York Times, April 20, 1916: p. 9.
  • "Patchogue." Suffolk County News, April 21, 1916: p. 2. -- Last paragraph remarks, "Patchogue will be the summer capital of the Austro-Hungarian Embassy in this country, according to present plans. Baron Erich Zwiedinek, Councillor and Charge d'Affaires of the Austro [sic]-Hungary Embassy at Washington, who has been in charge of Austro-Hungarian affairs since Ambassador Dumba was handed his passport will make his summer residence and also establish his summer office here. He is expected to arrive about the middle of June. The residence of Mrs. Wilmot M. Smith on South Ocean Ave. will be the home of the Embassy."
  • "Move Austrian Embassy. Baron Zwiedinek and His Suite Arrive at Patchogue." New York Times, June 23, 1916: p. 9.  -- Elizabeth Mott Smith's house was the Acting Ambassador's summer home, his staff occupying that of Ernest Petty, and an out building (all on S. Ocean Avenue) being used as the summer Embassy of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, a power with whom Patchoguers might have been chummy or deferential then, but with whom, ironically the U.S. would be at war before the end of the following year (Dec. 7, 1917).
  • "Patchogue." Suffolk County News, October 13, 1916: p. 2. -- 2nd paragraph remarks, "The Austro-Hungarian Embassy...have returned to Washington. The members of the embassy say that they have had a pleasant summer here." Of course, within half a year their country would be at war with the United States, and just over two years later, their Empire would cease to exist.

--  Banned by U.S. Army (soldiers prohibited from visiting Patchogue, and several other S. Shore villages)  
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Whiskey was Corn Cure.  Raid Near Camp Upton Follows Mishap at Railroad Station."  New York Times, December 14, 1917:  p. 15.  -- When a box of whiskey, labeled "Corn Cure," destined for the Medford Inn / White Oak Hotel accidentally smashed in the presence of a U.S. Marshall, he commandeered 3 deputies and an infantry squad from Camp Uption, surprised widowed hotel owner, Lucy Askins, and her hairdresser, Mae Burnie, who were arrested in an early prohibition raid on the hotel's "beauty parlor" which served liquor to soldiers
  • "Woman Innkeeper Guilty.  Convicted of Selling Liquor within Camp Zone.  New York Times, January 25, 1918: p. 6.  -- Askins was convicted of selling liquor to soldiers within a 5-mi. radious of Camp Upton, and Burnie's trial was next.  
  • "Army Ban on Patchogue."  Port Jefferson Echo, April 13, 1918:  p. 4.   -- General Bell bans Patchogue, East Patchogue, Blue Point, Sayville, and a 2-mile cordon outside it to all Camp Upton soldiers, except those with passes to see family whom they can prove live in the forbidden zone; a 60-man outpost, stationed at East Lake, was to patrol the entire area; violators subject to arrest and court martial. 
  • "District Attorney Helps Clean Up Patchogue."  South Side Signal, April 19, 1918:  p. 4.  -- Arrest of two women "for keeping allegedly disorderly houses", something else on General Bell's list of complaints.
  • "93 Ordered to Camp."  Suffolk County News, May 24, 1918:  p. 1.
  • "Soldiers May Now Go to Patchogue."  Port Jefferson Echo, June 1, 1918:  p. 1.

--  Beach claims
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Furman Claim Recognized." Port Jefferson Echo, August 28, 1915: p. 1.
  • "Beach Owners Join to Protect Titles: Association of Lot Owners Organized at Patchogue to Assist the State to Fight Claims of Mrs. Augusta M. Forbes. John M. Wilbur is President: Representatives of Attorney General Find Willing Helpers to Offset Alleged Ownership Set Up by Former Long Islander and Mrs. Nettie Valentine, of Brookhaven." South Side Signal, October 15, 1915: p. 1.

--  Bienhaur's Hotel
             See  Explosion  (below)
 
--  Burglary
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Crippled Burglars' Auto.  Darrow Prevented Escape of Men with Loot from Many Homes."  New York Times, December 24, 1915:  p. 5.

--  Casualties
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:
 

  • "More Casualties:  From Patchogue, Blue Point, and Islip They Come."  Suffolk County News, December 27,1918:  p. 1.

--  Croix de Guerre

  • "Patchogue Flier Honored:  K.R. Smith, Former Yale Student, Decorated for Sinking U-Boat."  New York Times, July 2, 1918:  p. 4.  -  Awarded France's Croix de Guerre and is promoted from Enseign to Junior Lieutenant in the naval air service. 

--  Diplomatic aspects
           See  Austro-Hungarian Embassy (summer residence)  [above]
 
--  "Disorderly houses"
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • Busy County Court Week: Patchogue and Riverhead Bad Spots Exposed." Suffolk County News, June 7, 1918: p. 1. -- Patchogue's contribution were a madam, her "disorderly house, and a female bigamist. The Riverhead account is of another house of ill repute, in the "New Brooklyn" section of Southampton.

-- Divided family loyalties
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "His Brothers [and nephews] Opposed in Conflict." Suffolk County News, September 18,1914: p. 2. -- For the family (from Alsace) of Frank N. Mayer, Patchogue businessman, WWI was a civil war.  Of his two brothers and their sons, one of each served in both the French and in the German armies, from mobilization at the outbreak of WWI, all having been incommunicado since then.  Alsace-Lorraine had been taken from France, by Germany, in 1870, and was disputed territory, at the outbreak of WWI.

--  Divorce

  • "Child Bride Gains Freedom:  Law Invoked Permits Trial Marriage for Young Girls."  New York Times, July 5, 1914:  p. 8.  -- A Patchogue girl, Gladys Robinson Greene, married at 16, to an 18 year old with her parents' consent, rapidly changes her mind and obtains an annulment, when she discovers that marriage is to those star-crossed lovebirds a bed of roses, with all too many thorns.

-- Draft
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Men in the Draft from Nearby Towns:  All Come from Sixteen Neighboring Villages; They are All in Groups -- From 19 to 36 Now Being Classified."  Patchogue Advance, October 4, 1918:  pp. 1, 6.

-- Drownings
 
--- LI Vertical File Sampler:

  • "A Double Drowning: Two Young Patchogue Men Lost Off Sayville, in Darkness Last Evening: George Brown, a Lace Mill Employeee, Fell Overboard from Auxilliary SloopEdna and His Friend, William Shannon Sprang to the Rescue." Suffolk County News,October 15, 1915: p. 1.

-- Educational aspects  
               See also  Anti-Germanism (above)
 
--- LI Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Patchogue Schools Bar German." New York Times, May 17, 1918: p. 9.  -- The study of Spanish is substituted, and under pressure German-language services have been discntinued by Emanuel Lutheran Church, while German-language newspapers areverboten, as well.

--  Elks (Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.  Patchogue Chapter)

  • "Whitman to Open Fair.  Will Address Elks' Carnival at Patchogue on Aug. 12."  New York Times, August 6, 1916:  p. 15.  -- NYS Governor Whitman and his military staff were in town, and available.  It was an election year.

--  Emanuel Lutheran Church
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Rev. Zoller to Go:  Pastor of Lutheran Church is Drafted by Patchogue; Labored Here for 17 Years:  Has Founded Three Churches and Will Endeavor to Build Up the Congregation in Our Sister Village -- Call for His Successor has been Extended."  Suffolk County News, March 12, 1915:  p. 1. 

-- Entertainment
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Stop Patchogue Benefit for 307th." New York Times, June 10, 1918: p. 9. -- Village President halts benefit performance in Palace Theatre, citing ordinances, public disapproval, and prior notice; theater manager "denounced" the village, on grounds that it was a benefit performance, funds to be donated to the 307th Infantry Regiment's tobacco fund; 500 left the theater, and cancer had to await another opportunity. 
  • "All Sunday 'Movies' Threatened by Court: Justice Fawcett Decides Againts Theatre Proprietor Arrested in Patchogue." New York Times, July 3, 1918: p. 11.

--  European Relief
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Save Stockings -- Make Baby Shirts."  Patchogue Advance, October 4, 1918:  p. 1. 

--  Explosion (Bienhaur's Hotel)
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Dynamite Joker at Large.  After Causing Panic, He Blows Up Stove in a Patchogue Hotel."  New York Times, April 21, 1914:  p. 9.

-- Ferries

  • "Motor Ferryboat Burns.  Passengers Taken Off by Fire Island and Coast Guard."  New York Times, August 24, 1915:  p. 7. 

-- Firemen's tournament
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Firemen Call Off County Tourney:  Suffolk's Vamps Decide that Annula Test of Fire Service is Secondary to that for the Defense of Their Country:  Pledge President Support:  Rousing Patriotic Gathering at Patchogue Instructs Executive Committee to Aid in Every Way Possible in Recruiting for the Army and Navy Departments at Once." South Side Signal, April 13, 1917:  p. 1.

-- Fishing
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Baymen are Fined for Net Fishing." South Side Signal, August 28, 1914: p. 1.

--  France
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Former [Patchogue] Advance Man Braves Shell Fire:  Pvt. Thomas Austin Smith Mentioned Before Regiment; Volunteers for Special Dangerous Duty -- Also Gets Near [Paris] to Demonstrate Machine Gun."  Patchogue Advance, October 4, 1918:  p. 1.
  • "Patchoguer Killed on French Front:  Three Local Boys Die in Camp of Pneumonia; Pvt. James Tymon First Local Man to Lose Life at Front -- Engaged to Patchogue Girl."  Patchogue Advance, October 4, 1918:  p. 1.

--  German language
               See  Educational aspects  (above)           
 
--  Graft, Highway
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Six Men on Trial for Highway Graft:  Officers of Suffolk Contracting Company and Two Engineers at Bar.  Built Patchogue Road:  John A. Hennessy's Chief Investigator to Testify at Riverhead To-Day."  New York Times, April 14, 1914:  p. 2.
  • "Says Tar Hid Road Work.  Coating Laid at Night to Conceal Shallow Filling, It is Asserted."  New York Times, April 15, 1914:  p. 8.
  • "'Movies' Pacify Graft Jury:  Rebellion Averted as Prosecution in Road Case Closes." New York Times, April 17, 1914:  p. 5.
  • "Kapper Hurries Graft Case:  Hint that Private Roads Got Some of State Highway Gravel."  New York Times, April 18, 1914:  p. 8.
  • "Road Grafters Sentenced:  Eight Months in Jail for Defendants in Suffolk County." New York Times, April 24, 1914:  p. 9.
  • "Six Win a New Trial.  Supreme Court Reverses Conviction of State Road Builders." New York Times, February 13, 1916:  p. S7.

-- Lawsuits 
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Chauffeur Sues Ex-Employer."  New York Times, July 5, 1914:  p. 10.   -- Albert Barthelme charges that he was pinned against a garage wall of Charles A. Billing's summer home (River Avenue, Patchogue), by his boss' car, suffering debilitating injuries that necessitate $5,000 compensatory damages.  How he came to be pinned by the car he drove is nowhere specified.
  • "Sues for Husband's Love. Wife Says Resort Proprietor Alienated Murdock's Affections." New York Times, September 20, 1914: p. 10.  --  A local love triangle becomes a legal tangle:  Sadie Murdock, wife of Charles H., presses her suit against Mrs. Matilda Avery, owner Avery's Five Mile Look (and was she ever looking), widow of the nastily belated (burned to death) Frank Avery, for the $75,000 return of Mr. Murdock's purloined affections.
  • "$75,000 for Husband's Love. Mrs. Sarah Murdock Alleges that Mrs. Avery Won Him from Her." New York Times, November 6, 1914: p. 12.
  • "Loveless Wife a Witness."  New York Times, November 13, 1915:  p. 9.

--  Long Island Railroad

  • "Train Kills Banker Higbie.  Fire Chief Petit of Babylon Dies with Him in Crossing Accident."  New York Times, February 6, 1916:  p. 3.

--  Maple Avenue School
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Battle Between Boy and Teacher."  Patchogue Advance, October 4, 1918:  p. 1. 

-- Morality campaigns
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:  

  • "Trumpets His Abstinence. Patchogue Paper Prints Affidavit of Lawyer Denying He is a Drinker." New York Times, August 1, 1914: p. 16.
  • "Organized for Moral Protection." Port Jefferson Echo, August 25, 1917: p. 1.

--  Naval aspects
             See also   Aerial operations  (above)

  • Hebe (U.S. Navy Department. Naval Historical Center. Naval History & Heritage Command. Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships)
  • Little Brothers(U.S. Navy Department. Naval Historical Center. Naval History & Heritage Command. Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships)
  • Little Sisters(U.S. Navy Department. Naval Historical Center. Naval History & Heritage Command. Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships)
  • Nemesis(U.S. Navy Department. Naval Historical Center. Naval History & Heritage Command. Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships)
  • Patchogue [I] (U.S. Navy Department. Naval Historical Center. Naval History & Heritage Command. Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships)
  • Patchogue (American Steam Ferryboat, 1912). Served as USS Patchogue (ID # 1227, later YFB-1227) in 1917-1922 (U.S. Navy Department. Naval Historical Center. Naval History & Heritage Command. Online Library of Selected Images - Civilian Ships)

--  Parades
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Great Day for Patchogue: 2,500 in Parade and Two Rousing Meetings in Evening."Suffolk County News, September 28, 1917: p. 1.
  • Liberty Day Parade to Have Four Bands:  Handsome Floats Now Being Prepared for Procession."  Patchogue Advance, October 4, 1918:  p. 1.

--  Ocean Avenue Hotel
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Girls Chase Peeping Tom. All the Help at Summer Hotel Hunt Man Seen at Window."New York Times, August 16, 1914: p. 15.  --  20 maids and waitresses of the bayside Ocean Avenue Hotel after hearing screams and "missiles" hurled through a window, raced outside to try to catch, and perhaps mug, a peeping tom, combing the grounds, alas, to no avail.

--  Peeping Tom
               See  Ocean Avenue Hotel (above)
 
--  Police
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Fakes Auto Mishap to Trap Murderer:  Farmer Brings Man Wanted for Killing Mrs. McVeety to Help Extricate Sleuth's Car.  He Confesses Crime:  Metscher Hit Woman in Whose Flat He was at Work, Because She Resented Improper Remarks."  New York Times, October 12, 1914:  p. 5.  -- Frederick Metscher, who had been on a drinking binge, went to her Brooklyn apartment to repair a parquet floor.  Instead, in error, he hit her head with a hammer, then fled.  A dragnet yielded no trace of him at first.  Then a tip from the Medford postmaster, who'd seen a man fitting Metscher's description pick up a loca farmer's mail, traced him to a Sayville area farm, where he was tricked into coming to the aid of a distress call and was captured.
  • "Girl Named Sheriff's Aid. Miss [Frances] Seitz, a Pistol Shot, Made a Deputy in Patchogue." New York Times, September 24, 1915: p. 4.  -- First such appointment in Suffolk County's history
  • "Arrested as Head of Auto Thief Band: Police Find Two, Accused by Stolen Jitney Owners, Ready for Florida Cruise. More than 60 Cars Taken: Sunday School Teacher, Turned Chauffeur, Confesses Long Series of Crimes." New York Times, October 16,1915: p. 20.  -- captured at Jones Dock, Patchogue
  • "Crippled Burglars' Auto.  Darrow Prevented Escape of Men with Loot from Many Homes."  New York Times, December 24, 1915:  p. 5.  -- Darrow removed spark plugs while they were busy burgling, and summoned the police, whom they escaped, only to be recaptured with the evidence (of additional last minute holiday thefts), when their car wouldn't start.
  • "Rob Summer Home of New Yorker."  New York Times, July 18, 1916.  --  While Mr. & Mrs. J. Hendrix were walking on the beach, jewelry thieves broke into their S. Ocean Avenue home, and made off with the goods, with the police on their trail. 
  • "Babylon Auto Driver Praises Patchogue Cop."  South Side Signal, September 21, 1917:  p. 4.  -- Patrolman Howard Jensen wins a friend for his "firm but gentle hand on travelers," caught speeding throught the village.

--  Polio  (Infantile Paralysis)
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "36 More Ill on Long Island:  Suffolk County has 23 New Cases and Nassau County 13." New York Times, August 23, 1916:  p. 22.  -- including one case in Patchogue
  • "100 More Ill:  2 Die in State:  Second Largest Daily Report, Not Including New York City."  New York Times, August 26, 1916:  p. 5.  -- 7 new cases in Patchogue alone
  • "Patchogue."  Suffolk County News, October 13, 1916:  p.2.  -- 3rd paragraph remarks, "Patchogue has another case of infantile paralysis , the first reported within three weeks -- Peter, one year old son of Nicholas and Josephine Anello.  The child was taken sick a week ago, but symptoms of paralysis did not appear until Tuesday." 

--  Post Office

  • "Names New Postmasters.  President Nominates Men for Long Island Offices."  New York Times, May 16, 1916:  p. 13.  --  President Woodrow Wilson's nominations included Frederick M. Welsh, Patchogue.
  • "Call Postmaster Disloyal:  Frank Holmann, of Medford, L.I. is Removed by [U.S. Postmaster General] Burleson."  New York Times, September 8, 1918:  p. 9.  -- Summarily fired while out of town, with no further detail than the charge of disloyalty made public, he is replaced by another Medford man, Albert Knight.  Holmann's wife denied the charge, and called for a fair trial to clear her husband's name.  Holmann was born in Germany, but left there as a child, and has resided in the U.S. for 33 of his 47 years, and is owner of a Medford Road (Rte. 112) hotel.

--  Regattas  [dateline, Patchogue]

  • "Great South Bay Fleet Disbands:  Alva Leads the Class P Sloops in Last Race of Cruising Regatta."  New York Times, August 16, 1914:  p. S3.
  • "Great South Bay Yachts Race."  New York Times, July 11, 1915:  p. 17. 
  • "Invader Again Victorious.  Gilbert Douglas's Boat Takes Prize in Great South Bay Regatta."  New York Times, August 15, 1915:  p. S3.
  • "Alva First in P Class.  Sails to Victory in Great South Bay Races -- Invader also Wins."  New York Times, August 13, 1916:  p. 15.
  • "Sylph Outsails Dolphin."   New York Times, August 20, 1916:  p. 13.

--  River Avenue School
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Asks Teacher to Wash 'Em:  Mother's Reply to Complaint About Dirty Pupils -- Warrant for Father."  New York Times, May 27, 1914:  p. 7.  -- Mr. & Mrs. Salvatore Ambrosio fall afowl of first teachers, then the principal, then the Truancy Officer, then the court, then the village Sanitary Insepector, for sending their two kids to school, filthy, and writing a note for the teahers to wash their kids.

--  Roads
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Patchogue Road Work."  New York Times, June 13, 1920:  p. 82.  -- Briefly covers road construction, condition, and improvements, 1917-1919. 

--  Roe's Hotel
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Roe's Hotel Afire:  A $10,000 Blaze in Patchogue on Monday Afternoon."  Suffolk County News, December 4, 1914:  p. 1.

--  Rose, Charles E.
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Obituary."  Suffolk County News, May 28, 1915:  p. 4.

--  Seal  
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Kill a Seal at Patchogue.  Before Coast Guard Dispatched It It Vanquished a Dog in a Fight."  New York Times, January 31, 1917:  p.4.

--  Smith, Elizabeth Mott (Mrs. Wilmot)
             See  Diplomatic aspects  (above)
 
--  Suffolk County, N.Y.  Committee on Home Defense
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Will Centralize Units:  Governor Whitman's Home Defense Corps is Planned to Unify Local War Organizations -- J.M. Ward, Secretary."  South Side Signal, April 13, 1917:  p. 1.

--  Sunday Blue Laws

  • "Pastors Fight Sunday Movies."  New York Times, September 6, 1915:  p. 12.
  • "Stop Benefit for 307th."  New York Times, June 10, 1918:  p. 9.  --  Palace Theatre owner publicly confonts and denounces the Village Board president who was stopping the showing of a soldiers' benefit movie, on a Sunday (without Board approval).  Goldstein vacates his audience from the theater, while not allowing the Board president to defend his actions.  500 people leave.
  • "All Sunday Movies Threatened by Court:  Justice Fawcett Decides Against Theater Proprietor Arrested in Patchogue."  New York Times, July 3, 1918:  p. 11.  --  Nathan Goldstein loses his case, with no immediate appeal possible.  Legislative lobbying by the motion picture industry, to modify the law, is so far, unsuccessful

--  Temperance movement
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Trumpets His Abstinence.  Patchogue Paper Prints Affidavit of Lawyer Denying He is a Drinker."  New York Times, August 1, 1914:  p. 16.  --  Arrington H. Carman publicly denies having touched alcohon in 3 years, to quell persistent rumors that he has been tippling, labeling those spreading such calmnies, "villains".  One has to wonder what sort of manifestations led others to draw such conclusions, and wheher or not he protests too much.

--  Tent Services
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Tent Services Closed."  Long Islander, September 4, 1914:  p. 5.  -- Methodist, Baptist, and 2 Presbyterian Churches had been holding services under the big top, the final one closing with "an appeal to all Christians to pray for the speedy end of the great war now prevailing in Europe."  Doubtless, prayers for wars-end was also on the lips of the "heathen". 

-- Trolley (Suffolk Traction Co.)
 
--- L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "A Nickel to Bayport: Or You May Pay a Dime and Ride to Patchogue; The Trolley Surprised Us: People Could Hardly Believe Their Eyes When the First Car Rolled into Town Last Saturday Afternoon -- West Sayville Anxious for the Same Service." Suffolk County News, August 14, 1914: p. 1.
  • "Motorman's Pluck Saves Passengers:  Prinzrang Clings to His Brake While Car Crashes Through a Fence and into a Lake.  Lone Fisherman Hurt:  Trolley went Over the Dam on which He was Sitting -- No Passenger was Seriously Injured."  New York Times, October 13, 1914:  p. 18.  -- When his trolley car suddenly jumped the tracks and pitched over a dam into Patchogue's West Lake, motorman Prinzrang kept his cool and saved the lives of his passengers by running over a fisherman (Harry Barthelme, probably another injury-prone relative of the lawsuit-prone chauffeur [above]).  Prinzrang's heroics were rewarded.  

--  Tuberculosis
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Campaign for Tuberculosis Hospital."  Suffolk County News, August 28, 1914:  p. 4. -- "Committee on a Suffolk County Tuberculosis Hospital", met in the NYS Supreme Ct. chambers, to aggressively persue public education, to build support for such a hospital.  Next meeting slated for 8/28 at Greenport.

-- Wedding
 
---  L.I. Vertical File Sampler: 

  • "Patchogue."  Suffolk County News, August 10, 1917:  p. 2. 

-- Women's participation
                See also  Ocean Avenue Hotel
 
--- LI Vertical File Sampler:

  • "Suffolk Primary Tickets: Something New -- Women Being Named for 'Committeemen.'" Long Islander, September 11, 1914: p. 5.
  • [Litt, Ruth.]  "Farming No Sinecure.  Women Who Take It Up Need Experience, Says Expert."  New York Times, April 29, 1917:  p. 85.

--  Yacht Racing
            See  Regattas